What is the B1 Visa for Business? The B-1 Visa for Business Visitors.

How do I get a Visa to visit the U.S.?

Citizens of certain countries may not require a U.S. tourist visa if the trip is less than 90 days. This is known as US Visa Waiver Program; however, there are certain criteria that need to be fulfilled in order to qualify for the VWP. Not all countries participate in the VWP, and not all citizens of participating countries qualify for the VWP.

Business Immigration Attorney
Business Immigration Attorney

Instead, if you wish to visit the U.S. for more than 90 days, you may require a Visitor Visa, which is also known as B2 Visa. Visitor visa is a non-immigrant visa issued to people entering US temporarily for pleasure, tourism, or medical treatment.

Visitor visa is also known as B1/B2 visa and it is subject to approval. Just as all non-immigrant visas, you must apply and get the visitor visa stamped in your passport.

Tourist visa B2, is granted for a specific purpose only such as tourism, medical treatment, etc., so if you’re entering the US with this visa, you should not be involved in study, business or work. Instead, if the purpose of your trip is business, you may apply for a B1 Visa (US business visa).

As for the length of stay in U.S. with this visa, can be 6 months or even less, which is subject to grant at the port of entry at US airport on arrival.

The tourist visa does not allow to work, and violators may be subject to deportation from the U.S.

In order to obtain a Visitor Visa, each applicant must have a valid passport, submit the application form, pay the fee, and appear for the visitor visa interview at the nearest applicable US consulate in their country.

What is the B1 Visa for Business?

The B1 Visa or “Visitor for Business” Visa is intended for Business travelers who come to the United States for business activities of temporary nature and related activities that do not require actual labor work.

The B-1 is a non-immigrant Visa and is obtained at the U.S. Consulate of the Country where the foreign national resides.

While in the United States as Business visitor, an individual may:

– Attend business meetings;
– Negotiate business and real estate contracts;
– Participate in academic conferences;
– Discuss planned investment or purchases;
– Solicit sales;
– Make investments or purchases;
– Control the operations of a Company in which the foreign national has invested;
– Receive temporary training from a U.S. Company;
– Settle an estate;
– Interview and hire staff;
– Conduct research.

It is generally not allowed to work with a B-1 Visa, although there are very limited exceptions to this rule, such as the B-1 in lieu of the H-1B. Running a business and gainful employment require a working visa application. If you are caught working on the B1 Visa, you may be placed in deportation proceedings and you will need to retain a defense lawyer.

Those entering with a B1 visa will generally be granted 6 months admission by the immigration officer at the U.S. Customs & Border Protection (CBP). The maximum allowable period is one year and the CBP officer has absolute discretion to decide the length of the stay (1 to 12 months).

If you are denied entry to the United States, you can file an immigration appeal. It may be possible to obtain a six-month extension to the visit visa as long as the candidate will be maintaining his or her visitor status. The B1 Visa can be issued for a single entry or for multiple entries.

If you are in the United States in another valid nonimmigrant status, you may be eligible to change to B-1 status, filing a Form I-539 (Application to Extend/Change Nonimmigrant Status).

If you are from a Visa Waiver Program country, the denial of the B-1 Visa will automatically revoke an already approved travel authorization, and might prevent you from getting one.

Spouse and children are not eligible to obtain a dependent visa. If they were to accompany you, they would have to apply for a B-2 tourist visa.

 

The B-1 Visa for Business Visitors.

In order to be able to enter temporarily in the United States, a business visitor must declare the specific reasons for his visit and should be included in one of the seven professional categories.

They are the following:
research and design; business expansion; manufacturing and production; marketing; sales; distribution; active sales service; general services such as: management, financial services, public relations, advertising and tourism.

Professionals and people who do business without being paid in the United States, will have to acquire a B-1 visa at the American Consulate in their home country.

Moreover, a person can enter the United States with a B1 visa for the purpose of after sales service on equipment or machinery bought in a foreign country.

This will apply for the life of the guaranty or service agreement.

The business visitors not listed above with a B1 visa will be equally admitted without another visa for as long as they can prove at the border, that they come temporarily to the United States to do legitimate business, to attend a conference, or for any other legitimate business reason and as long as they are not paid a salary while in the United States.

 

Guide to Naturalization. Uscis Form M 476. M-476 Form –